Can solving youth unemployment avert future conflicts?

The global youth unemployment rate is on the rise again. The UN’s International Labour Organization predicts that numbers will increase by 200,000 in 2018 to a total of 71.1 million (more than 13%). After several years of improvement from the crisis peak of 76.7 million youth employed in 2009, the problem is again getting worse.

In addition, more than 160 million working youths in the developing world are living on pay of less than $3.10 a day. Almost 90% of all young people live in developing countries.

There is a widespread assumption that youth unemployment and conflict are directly related, with a lack of economic opportunity associated with greater vulnerability to participation in armed violence, crime and other illicit activities.

One Young World Ambassador-led projects are alleviating poverty and developing the economy by providing access to training, education and employment opportunities. Yet young people are three times as likely to be unemployed as adults, and in 76% of countries with data more than one in ten youths are neither in education nor working.

If we do not create the 600 million jobs needed for young people in the next decade, how can we deal with the ramifications?